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20121204
20121204
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decisions? is it irrelevant to your business if we go over the fiscal cliff? how does a ceo look at what's happening in washington and decide for next year? >> most of the ceos look at the situation in washington with complete amazement and dismay to be frank about it. the problem is the ideological pinnings on both sides of this argument are so difficult to bridge that it's going to be hard for them to get a deal. >> he also said that they're fighting the wrong fight. i asked would you be willing to pay higher taxes yourself? warren buffett says rich should pay higher taxes. he said the fight should be about the corporate tax rate, doing things to goad corporations into spending money and into hiring, and into really building out their business, not just for small business but for big business, too. that's what the argument should be. the argument over tax rates for the rich is the wrong fight to be having. >> what worries me about this, you said these big ceos like fred smith will make decisions as we get closer to the fiscal cliff, because they have to kick in some of these changes. d
going over the fiscal cliff hurt or derail the insurance giant as many expect it to derail business in general? joining me now is the chairman and ceo of allstate. thank you for joining us. president and congressional leaders are meeting with state governors today. you're one of the ceos who met at the white house with some of your other colleagues in business. what's your stance of where we are right now in terms of a deal? >> i'm concerned about it. the good news is everybody sees this as an opportunity to really show american global leadership. the rest of the world is all messed up on this. we can show them how to get it done. they've also all agreed on the three buckets, that being revenues, entitlements, and spending reductions. the bad news is they haven't agreed on how much into each bucket. and i don't think they're trying to create a win/win for each other. most good negotiations, you try to help the other person come out with a win. i don't see that here. >> you have to operate your business regardless of what's going on around you. what is your gut? do you need to prepar
hyper focused on washington and the fiscal cliff negotiations. at the closing bell the dow is down 14 points. modest losses across the board. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper our efforts result in ty of care and ice we're able to provide... which means better health outcomes... anmore quality time to share with the onewho matter most. i love you, grandma! [ male announcer ] humana. ♪ liz: every year "inc." magazine comes out with its company of the year and this year it is zumba fitness. citing its business model as a major factor for the success. here with more on the company's growth and future plans, ceo and cofounder alberto pearlman. what a story with entrepreneural twist that is so amazing. you were a dancer at age eight. >> i wasn't a dancer. perez was the dancer. liz: but you know how to dance now. >> a little bit. but that was not the dancer. liz: how did you simply decide this was an idea that could really get going? >> well, i was having dinner at my parents house and my mom was taking his class. the creator of the class.
parts of the proposals to avert that fiscal cliff will really have. tonight we tackle the much-discussed concept of increasing tax rates for the top 2%. chief business correspondent ali velshi joins me now. help us cut through the spin. the partisans all have a different take on this. if you raise taxes on the top 2%, what's the impact? what does it look like and how much of an impact would it have on the deficit? >> well, let's look at it in two ways. one is income tax, right? right now, the highest earners, those households that earn more than a quarter million dollars a year, pay a higher tax rate on the marginal amount, the amount above the $250,000 a year. so we're talking about taking that rate from 36% to 39.6% if we even go there. that hasn't even been negotiated yet but that's 3.6% on every dollar you earn above $250,000. there are not a lot of studies that suggest that that would have catastrophic effects on the economy. the other area that democrats want to raise taxes are on investment income, things like capital gains, dividend income. now, those will jump signific
a little bit. obama's plan for the fiscal cliff includes 400 billion or so in unspecified cuts, while the republicans have offered 800 billion in unspecified higher tax revenues. has either side gotten specific enough for you guys? >> they haven't gotten specific enough yet, but they both staked out positions that are imminently compromisable. there's good common ground there. what's preventing that? the republicans saying we'll never raise taxes. the problem is taxes are scheduled to go up. they can't say no to that. they will go up. the only real question for the obstructionists in the republican party is, seriously, you're going to block atax cut? that's what it is. >> i want to play some sound from our friend david gergen on cnn yesterday and get you to comment. >> since this election i think the democrats are the ones who are really trying to rub it in and almost humiliate the republicans, and that's not going to get to a bargain. i think it has to be win-win. you hear among some democrats right now and it's disturbing that maybe just ought to take it over the cliff. we'll score
, then they're going to risk the whole economy in going over the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's sustainable. i don't think people fully understand, what the president is saying is 100% of american families and small businesses get continued tax relief on their first $250,000 in income, and on the income above that amount, higher income people would be paying the same rates they did during the clinton administration, which is four more cents on the dollar. and, again, i don't think that's at all unreasonable. the president talked about this at length during the presidential campaign, and i believe -- i think people like tom cole, a conservative republican in oklahoma had it right when he warned his colleagues they would look totally obstructionist if they allowed that to happen. >> congressman, also included in the president's plan was that $200 billion in new stimulus measures. mention the word stimulus to republicans, and, well, they're not too happy with that word. so why do that? why deliberately like -- it seems like it was a deliberate poke in the side. >> no, carol. this
a little bit. gridlock in washington over the fiscal cliff making stock investors really nervous. stocks are acting unpredictable. so watch out ahead here. companies should be making hiring and spending plans for next year. instead they're left wondering whether consumers are going to take home less money, and that government agencies can slash spending. a recipe for recession. i asked the ceo of fedex how companies plan ahead when washington is so dysfunctional. >> well i think most of the ceos look at the situation in washington with complete amazement and dismay, to be frank about it. the problem is, the ideological pinnings on both sides of this argument are so difficult to bridge, that it's going to be hard for them to get a deal. >> that's right. other ceos i talked to yesterday said they think it will be hard to get a deal, soledad and it's kind of a grim move right now in d.c. about how long it's going to take -- >> xavier becerra, it sounded like compromise could be on the table because they're going to come to this cliff deadline that will put pieces in place that maybe just ha
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7